Bolivia’s Morales Resigns Amid Right-Wing Coup, Gets Asylum in Mexico – US Behind It?

ER Editor: We also recommend this piece by RT titled Bots? ‘Thousands’ of newly-created generic Twitter accounts defend ‘right-wing coup’ in Bolivia.

UPDATE from RT:

Mexico grants Bolivia’s Evo Morales political asylum, demands safe conduct to ‘protect his life & security’

Mexico has approved asylum for former Bolivian President Evo Morales after the socialist leader was forced to resign from his post under pressure from military brass, amid opposition protests over a disputed election result which Morales has slammed as a coup.

The Mexican Foreign Ministry confirmed that asylum was granted to Morales on Monday, and insisted that the former leader is allowed safe passage out of Bolivia in the event he decides to leave the country.

“Latin America has witnessed unfortunate and violent events in which the constitutional order is broken and democratically elected authorities are forced to abandon everything to protect their life and security,” the ministry wrote in a communiqué, adding that Morales had “verbally and formally requested political asylum.”

“We will immediately proceed to inform Bolivia’s foreign ministry that under international law, it should offer safe conduct [to Morales],” FM Marcelo Ebrard told reporters.

Despite Morales’s departure from office and a new round of snap elections set in the coming weeks, chaotic protests continue across Bolivia.

********

Bolivia: President Evo Morales Resigns Amid Right-Wing Coup

His resignation came after senior army heads asked them to resign amid right-wing violence and coup attempt for weeks since the Oct. 20 elections.

TELESUR

Bolivian President Evo Morales was forced to resign Sunday after senior army and police chiefs called on him to do so following weeks of right-wing unrest and violence against his Oct. 20 elections victory in what his government has called a coup by opposition forces in the country.

  • Bolivian President Evo Morales was forced to resign Sunday after two weeks of right-wing violence.

“I decided to resign from my position so that Carlos Mesa and Luis Camacho stop abusing and harming thousands of brothers … I have the obligation to seek peace and it hurts a lot that we face Bolivians, for this reason, so I will send my letter of resignation to the Plurinational Assembly of Bolivia,” the former president of Bolivia said in a press release.

Bolivian Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera also said that he was resigning from his position. The two leaders said that they would be handing their resignation letters to the country’s National Assembly.

Since both the President and Vice President resigned, the president of the Senate, a position held by Adriana Salvatierra of the MAS party, was supposed to assume the post but she later issued her resignation as well as the president of the Chamber of Deputies.

Currently, the line of succession is broken in Bolivia.

Morales and Garcia Linera will stay in Chimore in the central Department of Cochabamba to work with the people.  “We will come back and we will be millions as Tupac Amaru II said,” Morales declared.

The resignation comes after Morales proposed a dialogue process with the opposition parties but was rejected, and even accepted the Organization of American States’ (OAS) call for new elections.

However, due to strong violent onslaughts against militants and leaders of the Movement To Socialism (MAS), intimidation of journalists, burning of residences and betrayal of political allies and members of the National Police, Morales and his Vice President decided to leave the government in order to prevent more violence.

In the interview with teleSUR’s correspondent in Bolivia Freddy Morales, the former president said the decision to call new elections was to preserve the peace in Bolivia “so that we do not confront the Bolivian family,” while calling on the opposition protesters to end the strikes and remove roadblocks in order to not harm the economy of the country.

******

‘Morales’ resignation undermines claims he is dictator, US may be behind push to oust him’

The US played a role in the resignation of Bolivian President Evo Morales, human rights and labor rights lawyer Dan Kovalik told RT. The US has been stirring unrest there for years with millions of dollars in “aid,” he said.

‘Morales’ resignation undermines claims he is dictator, US may be behind push to oust him’

“I think this is a bad thing that’s happened and I see the hands of the US behind it,” Kovalik said, adding that there has been “evidence released of conversation between the White House and opposition leaders,” indicating that anti-Morales protests might have been a “coordinated” campaign.

And we know that the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) has been spending millions of dollars in Bolivia for years trying to undermine Evo Morales

A CIA offshoot of sorts, the NED channeled nearly $1 million into the South American country in democracy promoting aid in 2018 alone. A huge chunk of the funds was used by the International Republican Institute (IRI), which promotes a right-wing agenda.

Kovalik said that more proof of US involvement in the turmoil is bound to come out with time.

Morales’ decision to resign rather than cling to power while risking the lives of his supporters, who turn out for mass rallies in his name, “undermines the claims that he is some sort of a dictator,” Kovalik said.

“That shows a lot about who he is. That shows that Morales cares about his own country… he’s shown himself to have the well-being of his own people at heart.”

Noting that Morales, the first indigenous leader in the history of his country, has vastly improved living standards for people, including the indigenous population, Kovalik argued that his departure might spell trouble for the South American country.

Kovalik believes that while right-wing parties might try to capitalize on Morales’s resignation, they lack grassroots support.

“I’m not sure they have much popular support, so we’ll have to see if Evo Morales’s party can go on and win without him.”

Thousands of people flooded the streets to protest what the opposition called a rigged election on October 20, in which Morales secured a 10-percent win, which allowed him to avoid a run-off. Morales, once a very popular leader, was faced with a wave of unrest and mutiny from the military. Kovalik believes that outside interference might have played a role in this change of heart.

“Of course, people change their minds about things, but I also think there’s been some manipulation of the public in Bolivia.”

************

Original article

••••

The Liberty Beacon Project is now expanding at a near exponential rate, and for this we are grateful and excited! But we must also be practical. For 7 years we have not asked for any donations, and have built this project with our own funds as we grew. We are now experiencing ever increasing growing pains due to the large number of websites and projects we represent. So we have just installed donation buttons on our websites and ask that you consider this when you visit them. Nothing is too small. We thank you for all your support and your considerations … (TLB)

••••

Comment Policy: As a privately owned web site, we reserve the right to remove comments that contain spam, advertising, vulgarity, threats of violence, racism, or personal/abusive attacks on other users. This also applies to trolling, the use of more than one alias, or just intentional mischief. Enforcement of this policy is at the discretion of this websites administrators. Repeat offenders may be blocked or permanently banned without prior warning.

••••

Disclaimer: TLB websites contain copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available to our readers under the provisions of “fair use” in an effort to advance a better understanding of political, health, economic and social issues. The material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving it for research and educational purposes. If you wish to use copyrighted material for purposes other than “fair use” you must request permission from the copyright owner.

••••

Disclaimer: The information and opinions shared are for informational purposes only including, but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material are not intended as medical advice or instruction. Nothing mentioned is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*